A plan in words – utilise nap time!

Unlike in Denmark, where at least one of my professional contacts has been on holiday since the third week of June until 1st August (I believe this is fairly typical!), this summer has become a busy time for me in relation to my PhD work. I’ve been forced out of my “reading and flailing” phase and into a more focused “aaargh I have to actually form this into a coherent jumble” phase. I have started planning for the Upgrade Portfolio which effectively means creating and assembling lots of written work (including a sample chapter, chapter abstracts, annotated bibliography), knowing what my chapter headings actually are, and writing a plan of action.

Today I have worked in the following places:

  • at the workhub while the toddler was in the nursery downstairs;
  • while I was eating lunch at home while the toddler was napping (she gets a tasty lunch at nursery *shakes fist in jealousy*);
  • and while sitting outside the toddler’s door (at her insistence!) as she fell asleep this evening.

Now, at 21 months old, she almost always has a 1.5 to 2 hour nap in the afternoon after lunch. After a long time of there being no routine to be certain of, I feel confident that if I plan for it I can use this time every day to do something productive. At the moment I use nap time to recharge my batteries, but I figure people working a “regular 9-to-5” don’t get that chance, so maybe I should change my mentality. I was inspired by a US-based translator I spoke to recently via video call who knew that her toddler (a year older than mine) always napped around 1pm so she fitted in some work in that time. It dawned on me that the net trickle effect of even just one more hour’s work a day could be very useful for my productivity! So here I am putting it in words, I’m going to utilise nap time!

EDIT (5 days on): Well, this has been unsuccessful so far. Two nap times this week coincided with travelling to/from visiting friends who are on maternity leave. Another nap time she refused to sleep, and consequently didn’t nap all day (this has happened a few times before, she is very sleep-resistant!). That was particularly frustrating as I had in mind a couple of things to do that day. It’s very hard looking after a toddler, she needs constant entertainment and supervision when awake, I think some childless people wonder why I can’t just whip the laptop out and work while she’s playing nicely in the corner. Sigh.

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Bookfairs and me

Since starting my studies last Autumn, I’ve attended three national book fairs: the BogForum in Copenhagen (November 2013), the London Book Fair (April 2014), and the BookExpo America (BEA) in New York (May 2014), and another book event called Crimefest in Bristol (May 2014). I spent the briefest amount of time at the BEA in New York, as it wasn’t officially open on the day I visited (but I attended a couple of seminars), so my impressions from this are limited. But here are some glib observations based on my experiences!

Size:

Naturally the Javits conference centre in New York for the BEA is huge. But that’s to be expected. When I visited the London Book Fair I was surprised by how big and empty it all felt, there were people milling about but it didn’t feel packed, but maybe that’s down to the size of the venue. I was most surprised by how large and busy the BogForum was – especially the amount of media attention it gets (on the morning television news, for example) and the huge number of stands and events, mostly focused around Danish authors and literature, not books in translation. Half-jokingly, one might think how can a country as small as Denmark have so many books?! It really brought home to me what a bookish nation Denmark is, despite regular paperback bestsellers costing the equivalent of around £20, it is a country of devoted readers.

Crowd:

The London Book Fair is primarily only for trade visitors, i.e. people who work in the publishing industry. In places it felt a bit surly and stand-offish to people like me just wandering around browsing; industry professionals arrange times to meet at each publisher’s stand and shake hands wearing suits. There were seminars, for instance I attended one on ‘Beyond Nordic Noir’ hosted by Nordic literary institutes hoping to widen interest in genres other than crime fiction from Scandinavia. But a cursory glance round the room revealed they were talking to themselves – a room of translators and people I recognised from other Nordic events, very little “outreach” to publishers or agents looking for something new! Denmark’s Bogforum is a huge national event, open to the public, and I saw many children and interactive activities for all ages and interests. The BEA falls somewhere in the middle – many of the exhibitors are there to talk business, but there were still book signings and book giveaways for the keen readers who attended. Crimefest was a lovely smaller event for real aficionados. I got the impression many delegates knew each other either from the social events surrounding the conference, or even from previous or similar get-togethers. There was perhaps a disproportionately higher number of older/middle-aged women than in other crowds, but I was surprised to see some younger delegates (in their twenties) too.

Position of translated literature:

London Book Fair‘s Literary Translation Centre was well-attended and got a fair bit of social media buzz, there are some good write-ups and videos around online of the seminars and discussions that took place there. For BEA, 2014 was the first year it had a section of the event called the Translation Market, devoted to books in translation, which is telling. I attended some seminars as part of the Global Market Forum ‘Books in Translation’ series, and – despite some excellent panellists – they felt a bit slapdash, rushed and marginalised, to be frank! Both BEA and the London Book Fair had stands for publishers from different countries (including Nordlit, see an earlier blog post of mine). Curiously I can’t remember the BogForum having the same, though it did have some publishers of translated literature, especially of non-fiction where related products could be marketed e.g. celebrity chefs. Crimefest had a remarkably well-attended and well-produced panel called Euro Noir, where translation was mentioned a number of times explicitly (including one translator being part of the panel!) and there were a lot of insightful and informed questions from the delegates. I also saw Swedish panellists Lars Kepler (a pseudonym for a husband-wife duo) interviewed in another panel on the same day, and the programme featured other Nordic Noir panels across the whole event.

Best coffee:

Back onto an inconsequential topic, Crimefest was near Park Street in Bristol which has a branch of Boston Tea Party, a lovely south west chain of coffee shops. At BEA I paid something silly like $8.00 for a regular Starbucks coffee, such is the mark-up at a conference centre! It was surprisingly hard to find coffee at London Book Fair, I arrived craving caffeine and wishing I’d taken advantage of the coffee cart outside on the way from the station. Bogforum had the best coffee – a few little espresso coffee carts dotted around with quick service at great value, a pleasant surprise.