Weekly Wipe reviews The Bridge (a few months old but still amusing)

“Thing is, it’s not a nice foreign land like in a holiday programme. It’s really cold and there’s all murders, and you can tell from looking at it that there’s hardly any colours allowed over there… everything’s grey and murky and muted and sort of ominous. It’s probably less depressing being murdered in Scandinavia than anywhere else on earth because even as you were dying you’d think, ‘oh well, at least it’ll be warm in heaven, and they’ll let me wear red trousers if I want’.

(from BBC 2 – Charlie Brooker’s Weekly Wipe)

Is anyone reading beyond Nordic Noir?

On the one hand:

1/4 of crime fiction readers had read a translated literary novel after reading a crime fiction novel from that language and 30% of those who hadn’t yet said they might in future: “One publisher supplied the metaphor of readers being ‘contaminated’ by their exposure to foreign crime novels and going on to explore foreign fiction in general as a result”.

(Engles, Paul. “Selling Ice to the Eskimos” Swedish Book Review, Issue 1 (2010), p38)

But on the other hand:

“The popular audience is not crossing over to elite foreign literature, where, it might be argued, a more incisive representation of foreign cultures is likely to be found, unconstrained by the generic demands made by crime writing”

(Venuti, L. The Translator’s Invisibility – a history of translation. London: Routledge, 2008 (2nd edition), p155)

So what’s it gonna be? Do readers of Scandi crime read any other genres in translation?

Nordic Noir event at All You Read Is Love pop-up cafe

My write-up of the informal panel discussion about Nordic literature and translation.

Nordic Noir: The Scandinavian Crime Book Club

Reading and Translating Nordic Literature and Nordic Noir to a Contemporary British Market

A rainy dark January evening in suburban London was an appropriate setting for discussion of Nordic literature and translation.

A panel discussion took place with UCL Scandinavian Studies PhD students Nicky Smalley, Anna Tebelius and Ellen Kythor led by senior lecturer in Scandinavian literature at UCL, Dr. Jakob Stougaard-Nielsen.

Each of the PhD students started by introducing the topic at the forefront of their minds in relation to the event’s title. For Ellen Kythor, this was the concept of Scandinavia as a “brand” as perceived by Brits, and how translators and publishers of popular novels may be creating and reinforcing the brand. Anna Tebelius discussed translation and art – her PhD project involves translating an experimental text from Swedish to English, and she has recently tried an artistic approach to translation using audio-recording equipment. Nicky Smalley’s PhD…

View original post 190 more words

Danish Book Launch: Murder in the Dark and Conversation with the Translator – video

This was an event I coordinated on 4th November for Norvik Press/the Nordic Noir Book Club. The most enjoyable part of the preparation was reading the novel (in translation) and doing a trial run of the video chat with the translator in advance. Thankfully it all went off without a hitch and the evening was a success!

Click through to view the YouTube video and the full post on the Nordic Noir blog.

Nordic Noir: The Scandinavian Crime Book Club

In partnership with Norvik Press, the Nordic Noir book club held a reception at University College London on 4th November 2013 to celebrate the publication of Dan Turèll’s Murder in the Dark. The book’s translator Mark Mussari took part in an interactive Q&A during the event, live via video link from the USA. You can watch the full video below (27 minutes).

The video Q&A was hosted by UCL’s new PhD student in Danish-English Translation Studies, Ellen Kythor, and the launch was made possible with support from the university’s School of European Languages, Culture and Society.

You can purchase Murder in the Dark now via the Norvik Press website.

View original post